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This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series. In the interest of creating a more extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproductThis scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series. In the interest of creating a more extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as a part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world's literature....

Title : English Literature: Its History and Its Significance for the Life of the English-Speaking World; A Textbook for Schools
Author :
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ISBN : 9781163676912
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 632 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

English Literature: Its History and Its Significance for the Life of the English-Speaking World; A Textbook for Schools Reviews

  • Samadrita
    2019-05-01 15:52

    This work is so antiquated and uninhibited in its bigotry in all shades that it's hard to believe it is still often recommended as a beginner's guide to the history of English Literature (till the Victorian era that is). For instance, the author often ends up digressing to wax poetic about the greatness of the Empire and while talking about great 'world literature' references only names of the Anglo Saxon and Norman variety. Women's contribution to literature is either blotted out or treated with a condescension that sets one's teeth on edge. Jane Austen is described time and again as a 'delightful little creature/thing' etc as if she were Long's kitty or something. Fanny Burney's contribution is restricted to a blink-and-you-miss 1-line mention while the Bronte sisters are called 'lesser novelists' of the age. Wuthering Heights doesn't even get a mention but to be fair to Long, Emily Bronte's genius wasn't recognized until much later. Elizabeth Barrett Browning's sky-rocketing popularity is sneered at and Long goes as far as hinting that even the consideration of her appointment to the post of Poet Laureate was undeserved. In contrast, he goes on to shower praise on her husband Robert Browning and Tennyson's creations. Mary Shelley or C.G. Rosetti don't even get honorable mentions. Mary Ann Evans is described as married to George Henry Lewes which as everybody knows now is a factual inaccuracy. If this was an attempt to save her feminine honour I don't know. Lastly, most wives of famous male novelists/dramatists/poets/essayists are stereotyped as unhelpful, philistine nags who hindered their spouses' creative endeavours more than anything else.'Tis a good thing this was first published in 1909, otherwise I might have rated this 2 stars at the most. But as is obvious this has not aged well. Not at all.

  • Tejas
    2019-05-01 11:49

    I used this book for three purposes:1. As a textbook for my Eng Lit Forms and Movements elective course at BITS Pilani2. As a reference for my personal project 'Impact of the Tudor Era on the World'3. As a source for lists and summaries of works by great English authorsAnd this legendary book served me brilliantly in all of the above regards

  • Sarazeen Saif
    2019-05-04 12:59

    This book, which presents the whole splendid history of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the close of the Victorian Era, has three specific aims. The first is to create or to encourage in every student the desire to read the best books, and to know literature itself rather than what has been written about literature. The second is to interpret literature both personally and historically, that is, to show how a great book generally reflects not only the author's life and thought but also the spirit of the age and the ideals of the nation's history. The third aim is to show, by a study of each successive period, how our literature has steadily developed from its first simple songs and stories to its present complexity in prose and poetry.

  • Staci
    2019-05-10 17:04

    A long but thorough look at the history of English Literature, starting from the Anglo-Saxon period and Beowulf through the Victorian Era. However, given that the book was originally written in the first decade of the 20th century its coverage of the Victorian Era and even of the 18th century is a little too close to b e able to tell what is really good, that is, what will eventually become a classic for the ages and what is just popular at the moment. However, all the eras are covered quite thoroughly, dealing equally with writers like Shakespeare as well as writers no one but an English professor would have probably heard of.

  • Anishsundar
    2019-04-30 10:08

    lov this book